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China warns Obama, McCain to toe line on Taiwan

by Staff Writers
Beijing (AFP) Oct 9, 2008
China warned the two American presidential candidates Thursday against supporting the independence of Taiwan, saying such moves will strain China-US relations.

The warning came after China learnt Barack Obama and John McCain supported a proposed 6.5 billion dollar arms package to Taiwan.

"The Taiwan issue is the core issue in China-US relations," foreign ministry spokesman Qin Gang told journalists.

"Thirty years of bilateral ties have shown that when the Taiwan issue is properly handled, the basis of the relationship is further developed. If not, the ties face twist and turns."

"We hope the two candidates can realise this, and respect and uphold the one-China policy... and oppose Taiwan independence."

China cancelled or postponed several military exchanges with the US after the Pentagon on Friday last week announced the proposed arms sale which includes advanced Patriot missile defence systems, Apache attack helicopters and submarine-launched anti-ship missiles.

When the US severed official ties with Taiwan nearly 30 years ago, Congress passed the Taiwan Relations Act requiring the United States to help the island territory defend itself.

Taiwan and the mainland have been governed separately since they split in 1949 at the end of a civil war but Beijing sees the island as part of its territory that is awaiting reunification, by force if necessary.

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Taiwan, China eye talks in October: report
Taipei (AFP) Sept 29, 2008
Taiwan and its rival China are expected to hold a second round of negotiations next month following historic talks in June, a newspaper reported Monday.







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